Thermal System and Renewable Energy Engineering

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Energy management system

Posted by ropiudin pada 9 Januari 2012


An energy management system (EMS) is a system of computer-aided tools used by operators of electric utility grids to monitor, control, and optimize the performance of thegeneration and/or transmission system. The monitor and control functions are known as SCADA; the optimization packages are often referred to as “advanced applications”.

The computer technology is also referred to as SCADA/EMS or EMS/SCADA. In these respects, the terminology EMS then excludes the monitoring and control functions, but more specifically refers to the collective suite of power network applications and to the generation control and scheduling applications.

Manufacturers of EMS also commonly supply a corresponding dispatcher training simulator (DTS). This related technology makes use of components of SCADA and EMS as a training tool for control centre operators. It is also possible to acquire an independent DTS from a non-EMS source such as EPRI

Operating systems

Up to the early 1990s, it was common to find EMS systems being delivered based on proprietary hardware and operating systems. Back then EMS suppliers such as Harris Controls(now GE), HitachiCebycSiemens and Toshiba manufactured their own proprietary hardware. EMS suppliers that did not manufacture their own hardware often relied on products developed by Digital EquipmentGould Electronics and MODCOMP. The VAX 11/780 from Digital Equipment was a popular choice amongst some EMS suppliers.

As proprietary systems became uneconomical, EMS suppliers began to deliver solutions based on industry standard hardware platforms such as those from Digital Equipment (laterCompaq), HPIBM and Sun. The common operating system then was either DEC OpenVMS or UNIX. By 2004, various EMS suppliers including ArevaABB and OSI had begun to offer Windows based solutions. By 2006 customers had a choice of UNIXLINUX or Windows-based systems. Some suppliers including NARI, PSI-CNI and Siemens continue to offer UNIX-based solutions. It is now common for suppliers to integrate UNIX-based solutions on either the SUN Solaris or IBM platform. Newer EMS systems based on blade servers occupy a fraction of the space previously required. For instance, a blade rack of 16 servers occupy much the same space as that previously occupied by a single MicroVAX server.

Other meanings

Energy efficiency

In a slightly different context EMS can also refer to a system in an organization to achieve energy efficiency through well laid out procedures and methods, and to ensure continual improvement, which will spread awareness of energy efficiency throughout an entire organisation.

Automated control of building energy

The term Energy Management System can also refer to a computer system which is designed specifically for the automated control and monitoring of those electromechanical facilities in a building which yield significant energy consumption such as heating, ventilation and lighting installations. The scope may span from of a single building to a group of buildings such as university campuses, office buildings, retail stores networks or factories. Most of these energy management systems also provide facilities for the reading of electricity, gas and water meters. The data obtained from these can then be used to perform self-diagnostic and optimization routines on a frequent basis and to produce trend analysis and annual consumption forecasts.

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